61 Eagles of Troop 175 & 275

Caleb J. Drake Jr. 1965
Michael C. Ellgass 1965
Bruce R. Bianchi 1969
Gregory A. Kozeny 1972
Anthony A. Lesniak 1973
John J. Namovic 1977
Ronald G. Drexler 1980
Robert J. Piontek 1980
James J. Strand 1982
Steven B. Weiss 1982
William G. Majewski 1983
Robert E. Majerowski 1985
Todd B. Kivlehan 1986
Kurt R. Kozeny 1986
Craig R. Czerlanis 1987
Mark J. Zaprzalka 1989
Fred Veikos 1991
Eric Wilhelm 1993
Kenny D'Aquila 2000
Robert Galassi 2001
John Witting 2002
Joshua Costes 2004
Michael Okun 2004
Christopher Langlo 2006
Daniel Wiechec 2006
Matthew Gianakopoulos 2006
 

James Seggeling 2006
Eric Neuhengen 2007
Andrew Beierwaltes 2008
Keith Banaszak 2008
Jerome John Palliser 2008
Bradley Langlo 2008
Michael Carr 2008
Jonathan Mazur 2009
Ronald Vick 2009
Kevin Neuhengen 2009
Matthew Bardelas 2010
Robert Martin 2010
Nicholaus Mazur 2010
Jeffery Gianakopoulos 2010
Christopher Vick 2010
Eric Carrabotta 2010
John Kaczkowski 2010
Timothy Duffey 2012
Robert Murdach 2012
Antonio Gonzalez 2012
Mark Neuhengen 2012
Evan Beierwaltes 2013
Andrew Nitz 2013
Ralph Joseph 2013
Ryan Martin 2013
Daniel Pietrzyk 2013
 

Adam Cieply 2014
Andrew Cichon 2014
Ray Joseph 2014
James Connolly 2015
Matthew Swaner 2015
Daniel Tagliere 2016
Mark Toledano 2016
Daniel Connolly 2017
Matthew Zalinski 2017
 

The fact that a boy is an Eagle Scout has always carried with it a special significance, not only in Scouting but also as he enters higher education, business or industry, and community service. The award is a performance-based achievement whose standards have been well-maintained over the years. Not every boy who joins a Boy Scout troop earns the Eagle Scout rank; only about 5 percent of all Boy Scouts do so. This represents more than 1.8 million Boy Scouts who have earned the rank since 1911. Nevertheless, the goals of Scouting--citizenship training, character development, and personal fitness--remain important for all Scouts, whether or not they attain the Eagle Scout rank.